Isn’t it amazing that the God of the Universe calls us friends? In John 15:14-15 Jesus speaks of this to his disciples when he says, “14You are my friends if you do what I command. 15I no longer call you servants, because a servant does not know his master’s business. Instead, I have called you friends, for everything that I learned from my Father I have made known to you.”

This Sunday is Friend Day at church and that theme is apparent in the song choices this week. We are putting a few hymns together to start off with which include:

What a Friend We Have in Jesus

My Jesus I love thee

Tis So Sweet

Tis so Sweet has another verse in it that we hadn’t ever done before but we are adding it in this week. It says:

Verse 4

I’m so glad I learned to trust Him
Precious Jesus Savior Friend
And I know that He is with me
Will be with me to the end

What a great verse! Before that song we are singing the first verse of “My Jesus I love thee” as an intro.  Sometimes the words of hymns can be confusing if we don’t know the context around them. “Here we raise our Ebenezer” in Come thou Fount is a good example. In My Jesus I love thee it has the line, “If ever I love thee, my Jesus tis now”. I have heard people question that because it sounds like we are saying that our love for Jesus goes up and down based on our circumstances. The writer of that hymn, William Featherstone, was only 16 when he wrote the hymn, and he wrote it shortly after he was converted from a life of sin. You can imagine how his life would of changed and how some of his friends might not have understood. It is in those times, when our love for Jesus grows. When we stand up for our faith, we can say, “if ever I love thee, my Jesus tis now.” Check out this story about the hymn:

A Protestant Episcopal Bi­shop of Mi­chi­gan once re­lat­ed the fol­low­ing in­ci­dent to a large au­di­ence in one of the Rev. E. P. Ham­mond’s meet­ings in St. Lou­is. “A young, tal­ent­ed and ten­der-heart­ed ac­tress was pass­ing along the street of a large ci­ty. See­ing a pale, sick girl ly­ing up­on a couch just with­in the half-open door of a beau­ti­ful dwell­ing, she en­tered, with the thought that by her vi­va­ci­ty and plea­sant con­ver­sa­tion she might cheer the young in­va­lid. The sick girl was a de­vot­ed Christ­ian, and her words, her pa­tience, her sub­mis­sion and hea­ven-lit coun­te­nance, so dem­on­strat­ed the spir­it of her re­li­gion that the ac­tress was led to give some ear­nest thought to the claims of Christ­i­an­i­ty, and was tho­rough­ly con­vert­ed, and be­came a true fol­low­er of Christ. She told her fa­ther, the lead­er of the the­a­ter troupe, of her con­ver­sion, and of her de­sire to aban­don the stage, stat­ing that she could not live a con­sis­tent Christ­ian life and fol­low the life of an ac­tress. Her fa­ther was as­ton­ished be­yond mea­sure, and told his daugh­ter that their liv­ing would be lost to them and their bu­si­ness ru­ined, if she per­sist­ed in her re­so­lu­tion. Lov­ing her fa­ther dear­ly, she was shak­en some­what in her pur­pose, and par­tial­ly con­sent­ed to fill the pub­lished en­gage­ment to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a gen­er­al fa­vo­rite. Ev­ery prep­a­ra­tion was made for the play in which she was to ap­pear. The ev­en­ing came and the fa­ther re­joiced that he had won back his daugh­ter, and that their liv­ing was not to be lost. The hour ar­rived; a large au­di­ence had as­sem­bled. The cur­tain rose, and the young ac­tress stepped for­ward firm­ly amid the ap­plause of the mul­ti­tude. But an un­wont­ed light beamed from her beau­ti­ful face. Amid the breath­less si­lence of the au­di­ence, she re­peat­ed:

‘My Jesus, I love Thee, I know Thou art mine;
For Thee all the follies of sin I resign;
My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art Thou;
If ever I loved Thee, my Jesus, ’tis now.’

This was all. Through Christ she had con­quered and, leav­ing the au­di­ence in tears, she re­tired from the stage, ne­ver to ap­pear up­on it again. Through her in­flu­ence her fa­ther was con­vert­ed, and through their unit­ed evan­gel­is­tic la­bors ma­ny were led to God.”

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